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R.I.P. Lake Ponting: A Supraglacial Lake Disappears in Greenland

Approximately 80 percent of the surface of Greenland is covered by the Greenland Ice Sheet, the world’s second largest body of ice after the Antarctic Ice Sheet. In June 2011, Dr. Marco Tedesco of the Department of Earth & Atmospheric Science, City College of New York (CCNY), led a team of scientists to Greenland to study surface features of the ice sheet and to collect data on solar energy being absorbed by the snow and ice.

One of the most dramatic features of ice sheets is the appearance of supraglacial lakes, pools of meltwater up to a few miles wide and 6 to 8 meters deep that form during the summer. What’s even more dramatic is that these lakes can disappear within hours, completely draining through vertical shafts called moulins that often extend all the way down to the bedrock under the ice. Tedesco captured some astonishing video of just such an event as Lake Ponting, near his campsite, vanished before his eyes. The footage, edited into the above film “meltzone 2011″ is to our knowledge the fist time the death of a supraglacial lake has ever been photographed. Tedesco described the experience in a two-part article for CCNY’s Alumnus magazine:

Standing at the bottom of the former lake right after its drainage was one of the most profound experiences of my fieldwork activities. After the lake had drained, large blocks of ice (up to five meters high and several meters wide that had been literally swirling on the lake like huge ice cubes in a giant cocktail glass while it drained) were spread around the moulin. This was swallowing water rushing from the top of the icy hills surrounding the lake. We could not see the bottom of the moulin but were able to see water heaving up from one of its walls and splashing against the opposite side in an enormously powerful and impressive way.

Studying these supraglacial lakes is important because once they drain, their water can have a lubricating effect on the bottom of the ice, accelerating its slide toward the sea. Tedesco and his team are currently analyzing the data they collected in Greenland to improve our capability to predict the impact of the Greenland ice melt on sea level rise.

Read more about Dr. Marco Tedesco’s work at www.cryocity.org. Follow and share information on the melting of the Greenland ice sheet at  www.greenlandmelting.com.

The Story of a Flying HIPPO: The HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observation Project

Since 2009, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observation (HIPPO) project has conducted a series of global flights to measure atmospheric constituents. The data collected on these flights will be vital for informing policy related to climate and climate change.

On HIPPO’s missions from August 9 to September 9, 2011, ClimateScience.tv provided the scientists and crew with a video camera to document their experiences. The HIPPO team returned with some stunning aerial footage, from the lush jungles of Hawaii to the icy floes of the Arctic Ocean. We took their dramatic images, combined them with post-flight interviews, and created this four-minute film documenting HIPPO’s month-long voyage around the globe.

To learn more about HIPPO, visit:

Up From the Briny Deep: Collecting Deep-Sea Sediment Cores

Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is home to the world’s largest collection of deep-sea sediment cores. These cores—and the microfossils contained in them—allow scientists to look back on thousands of years of climate conditions from all over the world. In this short film, Peter deMenocal, the chair of Columbia’s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, describes new techniques for retrieving sediment cores from the depths of the ocean and how they help us understand global climate change.

Operation Deep Freeze: Early Ice Core Drilling

From 1955 to 1996, the Navy managed all U.S. scientific research in Antarctica. ClimateScience.tv uncovered this 1959 footage of the Navy’s “Operation Deep Freeze.” It’s a fascinating record of early ice core drilling techniques—with a couple of seismic blasts thrown in for good measure.

Click the “Film Log” tab above to read the Navy’s notes as you’re watching the film.

For more information on Operation Deep Freeze, check out:

1) LS J.J. ANDERSON, U. OF MINN. PULLING OUT WIRE ON TO THE GLACIER; WIRE IS LAYING ON GROUND IN FG.2) CU DR. E. THEIL READING A GRAVITY METER, HOLDS EYE ON THE EYE PIECE. G3) MS J.J. ANDERSON CIV. SCIENTIST WALKING TOWARD CAMERA WITH VIBRATION PICK UP DEVICES. R4D IN BG WITH DEAD ENGINES.G4) MLS MR. ANDERSONHOOKING UP THE PICK UP DEVICE TO MAIN WIRE OR CABLE; R4D SITS ON SNOW IN BG.5) MS MR. ANDERSON WALKING TOWARDS THE CAMERA. G6) CU HOOKING UP THE PICK UP DEVICE TO MAIN WIRE, BURYING THE DEVICE IN THE SNOW; TAPPING IT DOWN WITH HIS FOOT. VG7) ECU MR. ANDERSON HOOKING THE ALLIGATOR CLIPS ON THE PICK UP DEVICE TO THE MAIN CABLE; MAKES A HOLE IN THE SNOW WITH HIS HEEL ON HIS BOOT AND PLACES THE DEVICE INTO THE HOLE. G8) CU MAN WITH AN ICE CORE DRILL BORING AHOLE INTO THE ICE FOR A BLAST CHARGE; SECOND MAN COMES IN TO HELP. G9) CU CORE DRILL DRILLING INTO THE ICE, MAN’S FEET SEEN IN RIGHT. G TO F10) CU MAN TURNING HANDLE ON ICE CORE DRILL; WIRE AND INSTRUMENT SITTING ABOUT ON THE SNOW. G11) CU TWO MEN LOWERING ICE CORE DRILL INTO HOLE, ONE MAN LETS GO AND THE SECOND KNEELS AND CONTINUES TURNING HANDLE. THE MAN USING DRILL IS EDWIN ROBINSON OF U. OF MICH.12) CU MAN REMOVING DRILL FROM SHAFT, TAKES ICE FROM SHAFT, AND PLACES DRILL BACK ON, TWO MEN AGAIN LOWER DRILL. G13) CU MR ROBINSON KNEELING BY THE SHAFT. G14) MS SIDE VIEW OF R4D SITTING ON THE SNOW; MAN IS SITTING ON THE SNOW OFF PORT WING. A SIESMIC BLAST GOES OFF NEAR THE TAIL SECTION OF THE R4D AND BLOWS A LITTLE CLOUD OF SNOW UP INTO THE AIR. VG15) MS MAN KNEELING IN THE SNOW SETTING OFF A SIESMIC BLAST WHICH THROWS UP SNOW. G16) CU TWO MEN STANDING BY THE WIRE REEL IN A CRADLE; MEN ARE REELING IN A WIRE. G17) MS ONE MAN IN THE R4D HANDING AN INSTRUMENT TO THE MEN ON THE GROUND; MAN WALKS AWAY WITH THE INSTRUMENT; MAN IN PLANE STEPS DOWN WITH A LARGE OBLONG WOODEN BOX AND MOVES OUT TO LEFT. G18) CU ONE MAN USING THE ICE CORE DRILL. SV G